Thirsty for a Bloodhound Brown Ale? This Philly Brewer Guarantees No Mediocre Beers

Laura Lacy, owner of craft beer maker Attic Brewing Company, is crowdfunding for the money she needs to buy brewing equipment, so she can open up in a newly hot Philadelphia neighborhood.

Zoe Searles By Zoe Searles

Laura Lacy has a passion for craft beers — now, she wants to share it with her Philadelphia neighbors. That’s why she’s opening a storefront location for her business, Attic Brewing Company, in the city’s historic and culturally rich Germantown neighborhood.

Lacy’s love of brewing grew from what she calls a “humble beginning.” She and her husband Todd Lacy started out home-brewing for fun in 2010 in their third-floor attic apartment in Germantown. At that time, Laura was working as an operation manager at H&M, helping the clothing retailer grow in profits, open new locations and hire staff. But in 2016, she left H&M to begin to transform the pair’s hobby into a business. Lacy took on jobs at other area breweries, where she planned events and worked with malt to learn the ropes.

Now, the couple aims to take Attic Brewing Company to a new home: a 6,000 square-foot location just a few blocks away from where it all started. They plan to sell beer directly to consumers in their own tap room, rather than put it on store shelves. With this strategy, Lacy says she will be able to serve customers a fresh product, receive immediate feedback and turn higher profits. “By cutting out packaging costs and eliminating the distributor, we will be able to make the highest profit with every beer we sell,” the campaign says.

She also wants to fill a need she sees in her Philadelphia neighborhood for a craft brewery.  She says Attic Brewing Company will be a local business built on brand loyalty, a fair and inclusive work environment  — employees, she promises, will receive fair pay and benefits — and, above all, the love of good beer.

The Money: Lacy is raising money through an equity crowdfunding campaign on WeFunder, which offers contributors a stake in the company, rather than perks. She hopes to raise between $100,000 and $500,000 to pay for the brewing equipment she needs.

Related: Read about other women crowdfunders we’ve featured.

Posted: April 10, 2018

Zoe SearlesThirsty for a Bloodhound Brown Ale? This Philly Brewer Guarantees No Mediocre Beers