Nathi Eustaquio: Empowering Immigrant Women 

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Name: Nathi Eustaquio

Business: Empowering Immigrant Women 

Location: Waimea, Hawaii, U.S.

Industry: Personal Services

Reason for starting? I started my business because, after going through a really tough time trying to realize who I was as a resident of a new culture, I discovered that we don’t have many places to search for help that will truly understand our emotional needs and desires as immigrant women. It goes beyond being successful and finding a job, it’s about rediscovering who you are in a new culture. Once I understood it, I rediscovered my identity. I was finally that empowered women that I knew, but now I needed to help others to do the same.

The channel that I use to empower immigrant women and help them transition from their old self to an empowered one is that of the Transition Coach. Immigrant Women are craving help as they are seeing so much potential being wasted every day in a society that does not recognize them, yet, as a strong, intelligent part of the culture.

Related: Read about another personal services entrepreneur here.

How do you define success? For me, success is a hard word to define because every person understands it from a different perspective. In my opinion, success is a result of preparation and self-development. In order to be prepared and understand what success means to you, it’s important to understand yourself and the things that are important to you in life. I found that every role model I have, like Oprah, Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Maya Angelou, my mother… they all give a lot of importance to self-development and understanding oneself. With them I learned that knowing yourself is the secret, because then you can define what is success for you and work on that goal. Success is the journey to improvement, is to learn and get better at the things you love to do and nurture the relationships you value.

Biggest success: My biggest success was to have the courage after 22 years of life to look for my biological father. I had never known him, my mother never mentioned him, but I needed to understand my story. After years of therapy, self-development and a good dose of courage, I started looking for him and could finally put the pieces of the puzzle of my life together, to understand a big piece of my story and who I was. After that, I felt liberated to pursue my dreams, and it was when I decided I was ready to travel abroad. Facing my personal fears and understanding my story opened me up to create healthy relationships in my life, to pursue my dreams and not feel guilty about it. And also allowed me to understand that I was loved, and I deserved to be loved.

What is your top challenge and how you have addressed it? My top challenge was to re-adapt to the new culture and understand who I was in all spheres of my life as an immigrant. Having support from other people and a big desire to succeed and serve were the motors for my transformation. I addressed my challenge of not knowing the language, studying it and practicing, practicing and practicing. I addressed my career challenge, searching for possibilities, networking and developing my own business where I could use all my potential to serve people, and help immigrant women to thrive and find their paths in their new country.

Related: A Lawyer Aids Immigrants’ American Dreams 

Who is your most important role model? My most important role model is my mother. She one of four women in a family of eight siblings. She had to work at an early age to help the family and dropped her studies before high school. She was finally able to finish her studies after having three children, a family, and a job. She taught me that is never too late to pursue your dreams, and that nothing in life changes who you are. You can lose everything, but your character and education will always remain. Throughout my life, my mom has been my biggest example of resilience, honesty and fearlessness, and I am so lucky to have her not just as a mother, but as a mentor.


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Edited by The Story Exchange

Posted: November 6, 2017

Victoria FlexnerNathi Eustaquio: Empowering Immigrant Women